Brain Eating Amoeba in Water Supply. Its OK though. Really.

Brain Eating Amoeba in Water Supply. Its OK though. Really.

I love how lax this article is. For all the worrying and 24 hour news bullshit going on this article really just kicks back, relaxes maybe burns one down. “Listen, listen…You can only get this horrendous brain eating amoeba if you get the water in your nose. Like all the way up your nose. You can’t even get it from drinking water brah. Just don’t take a bath.” Oh good I was only going to be worried if I could get it from drinking the water. Now I can drink this brain eating amoeba free from worry. 

And Dr. Raoult Ratard from LSU may just be that. A Ratard. See what I did there. I love his fucking quote “It’s not a question of having water just up your nose, as it has to go all the way up to the roof of your nose,”. Oh gee thanks Ratard. Good to know its got to get all the way up my nose. That never happens accidentally. Ever. Frankly I’m surprised I even know what he’s talking about because of how rare it is for people to get water all the way up their noses. 

There have been 120 U.S. cases since 1960 and three fucking people lived. THREE. Are you out of your fucking mind?! I won’t set foot in Louisiana. I had all these plans of going to Mardi Gras, but fuck it. No chance I’m gonna risk it with a brain eating amoeba. 

I might just be permanently scarred from this. Just ruined warm freshwater rivers and lakes for me. Thanks a lot Dr. Ratard.

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3 thoughts on “Brain Eating Amoeba in Water Supply. Its OK though. Really.

  1. Karen S says:

    I have gotten water all the way up my nose in the shower when I’ve bent down to pick up a dropped shampoo bottle. I’m not going to Louisiana either, but then again I never planned to! They sure have some low standards down there don’t they?!

  2. Scott B says:

    Two questions…

    1) how many OTHER water supplies have this issue in the US? Was LA just the first to test since the girl got it? Meaning more states are sure to follow…

    2) How do you remove em? Chemical or filter…

    • jdsalemi says:

      I’m unsure from the article. It appears to be an isolated incidence. The way they are getting rid of them is simply chlorination. I bet this has a lot to do with a local well water supply or something. I think most modern reservoir and water treatment plants do a good job at getting rid of these bastards.

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